Nose

WritersToday my haiku is from September 30th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Nose”:

have cabin fever?
open a window and breathe
your nose can heal you

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Acting on the Page

Halloween ghost, 3dWhen you become a ghost, you must learn to think like someone else. You will learn how others think—even others radically different than you. Like actors, ghostwriters play many roles, just on the page instead of the stage. Unlike an actor, I’m not constrained by my gender, age, race, or culture. I am a middle-aged white American woman from the West Coast. But as a ghostwriter, I’ve been an African-American man from New York, a Japanese-American woman, an Iranian immigrant, a self-described redneck from Oklahoma, and oh yes, some middle-aged white American women. I’ve been any age from 20 to 90. I’ve been a doctor, an accountant, an entrepreneur, a cop, a scientist, a shaman, a gardener. Etcetera.

Here are some things I’ve learned over the years of pretending to be someone else. At heart we are all the same. We all want to love and be loved. We all want our lives to be meaningful. We all want to explore possibilities and practice our talents. And yet, we are all so gloriously different in how we express our wants.

I love being a ghost.

 

The above is another excerpt from my ebook Ghost Stories for Real Ghosts, which is part of my online course “Learn to Ghost.” If you’re interested in becoming a ghostwriter, check it out here.

Room

WritersToday my haiku is from September 23rd of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Room”:

a room full of books
other lives waiting for you
read and make them real

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Breeds

Welsh Corgi qui rigoleAlex Terrgi here. I don’t know why humans are so fond of creating new dog clans. Puggles and Labradoodles and Goldendoodles and I don’t know what all. It sounds like they’ve been reading too much Harry Potter.

Take me, for example. My human says I am “probably” a Terrgi. She says probably because terrgi is a word she made up. She says my head looks like a Terrier and my short legs and long body look like a Corgi. But she doesn’t really know, because she adopted me from a shelter and the shelter didn’t know either because they found me running loose on a city street when I was just a pup.

My feeling is that it doesn’t matter. She can call me a Terrgi if she wants to, but I think “dog” should be good enough.

Flit

WritersToday my haiku is from September 16th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Flit”:

no haiku today?
images flit through your mind
but the words don’t form

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Worry

beautiful 35 year old woman stands in front of the windowAlthough it had been my dream since childhood, I did not become a full-time writer until I was middle-aged. It was a scary decision, and many co-workers, acquaintances, family, and friends thought I was completely bonkers to give up a well-paying job for a nebulous dream. Even after I proved that I could indeed support myself by writing, they thought I was nuts to continue with it. “I’d never do that,” said my former co-workers. “Are you sure you can keep jumping over all the hurdles, especially at your age?” said one of my helpful aunties. “Aren’t you worried about the future? What will happen when you get old?” asked one of my closest friends.

Ah, those hurdles. They are there, you know. But I found that the hardest hurdles to jump over were all in my own head. Worrying about whether I’d spend all my savings and end up on welfare, worrying about pleasing my clients, worrying that no one would hire me, worrying that I’d embarrass myself and my family by failing, worrying worrying worrying.

I’m not sure you can ever banish worry entirely. It seems to be part of who we are as humans. But I have learned to replace much of my worry with trust. On good days, and even on average days, I trust that the universe wants me to succeed. I trust that if I do my part, the universe will do its part.

But I confess that on bad days I might revert to worrying. There have been days when I’m sure the proverbial bag-lady is hanging out in my closet, waiting for me to fail so she can lend me her shopping cart. I start to think longingly about handy things like salaries, medical benefits, 401Ks, sick days, and vacations days—you know, all those “guarantees” that I used to have.

And then I remember that the word guarantee represents a total illusion. No amount of worry will guarantee success. Worry does not work. One of my favorite quotations about worry is by Peter McWilliams: “Worry is interest paid on a debt you may not owe.”

I also remember those people in my life who have supported me in this crazy dream. Especially my two grown daughters, who have been kind enough to tell me they have been inspired by my mid-life leap, and when they get to middle age, they will know how to do it right. It is comments like these, from people I love and respect, which remind me that we are all teachers for one another. We’re not here for ourselves.

BTW, none of my worries came true. What a waste of time worry is.

The above is an excerpt from my ebook Ghost Stories for Real Ghosts, which is part of my online course “Learn to Ghost.” If you’re interested in becoming a ghostwriter, check it out here.

Focus

WritersToday my haiku is from September 9th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Focus”:

trying to focus
on many projects at once
will make your brain freeze

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Speaking

WritersToday my haiku is from September 2nd of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Speaking”:

if you spent a day
speaking only in haiku
much would stay unsaid

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.