The Grateful Dog

Dry cat food in blue bowl, detail on white.Alex Terrgi here. A couple of days ago it was a holiday called Thanksgiving. It consists of a lot of food, which is the best part. But also after everyone had eaten and eaten and eaten some more, the humans talked around the table and said what they were thankful for. Nobody asked me, but if they had I would have said this:

I am thankful for:

  • my human, naturally
  • my full food dish
  • the smell of cooking
  • my human’s granddaughters and grandson, because human children are fun to play with
  • my dog bed that smells like me
  • the dog park I visit a couple of times a week
  • the smell of Alpo
  • my dog walker lady
  • the smell of bacon
  • my full water dish
  • the smell of my back yard
  • the smell of the bed where I sleep with my human at night
  • the smell of squirrel
  • the smell of crow poop
  • the smell of the dogs who walk down my street
  • the smell of the garbage cans

Hmm, there seems to be a theme here …

Haiku Friday: Feng Shui

Today my haiku is froPhilosophersm November 27th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Philosophers, Scientists, and Other Ponderers, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Feng Shui”

learn to go lightly
feng shui away your treasures
they’re not what you think

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Give Yourself a Break

Close-up of woman's feet in a bubble bath

I have a problem with guilt, probably because I was raised by a workaholic father who was raised by a Puritanical mother. It is hard for me to do nothing. It is especially hard for me to write nothing. Because that’s who I am, see? I’m a writer, so if I’m not writing, then guilt spreads its snarly tentacles throughout my brain. The unfortunate part of this mindset is that guilt does not produce much.

So when I talk to other writers, I advise them to not be like me. Here’s what I tell them:

Take a day off and do no writing at all. Don’t even turn on your computer. Forget you are a writer. Pretend you are a plumber, or an accountant, or a scuba diver. Go for a walk. Call your brother and give him some advice. Go shopping and buy something you never thought you’d wear. Go swimming at the YMCA to exercise more of your body than just your fingers. Take a bubble bath. Sing folk songs at the top of your lungs. (You can sing in the bath if you want.)

It doesn’t matter what you do on your day off as long as you don’t write anything. Not even a check or a shopping list. Pretend the keyboard, the pens, and the pencils have been sprayed with vile chemicals that will make all your hair fall out immediately.

Do this exercise at least once a month. Eventually you will become sane again.

Sometimes I even take my own advice.

Haiku Friday: Promises

PhilosophersToday my haiku is from November 20th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Philosophers, Scientists, and Other Ponderers, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Promises”

holding hands with Death
in a silent, pathless land
where promises fade

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Vacations, Bah

Toroweap PointAlex Terrgi here. My regular dog-walker went on vacation to something called the Grand Canyon, which my human said was a big hole in the ground. My dog walker seemed pretty excited even though it meant she couldn’t see me for a week. I think I’m much more exciting about a hole in the ground, so I don’t understand why she chose the vacation over me.

She’s back now, and she looks just the same. I guess the hole did not swallow her. I hope she never does this again.

Wrinkles

PhilosophersToday my haiku is from November 13th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Philosophers, Scientists, and Other Ponderers, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Wrinkles”

smiles hide in wrinkles
sparks escape your sunken eyes
you say what you know

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here http://bit.ly/HaikuPhilosophers

Uncomfortable Creatures

creature-discomfortsCondensing a short story into 140 characters is not that easy. But I’m trying. Here are some tweets I’m trying out, hopefully to encapsulate the spirit of three short stories in my collection Creature Discomforts. Tell me what you think.

Cold-eyed cats enact revenge on whisker-thief musician. “The Boogy Cats” in Creature Discomforts. #shortstories http://amzn.to/1LOOm5L

It’s not good when your clichés come to life. “Alligators” in Creature Discomforts #shortstories http://amzn.to/1LOOm5L

When purple spiders spin purple webs, women get caught. “Harvest Time” in Creature Discomforts http://amzn.to/1LOOm5L

Haiku Friday: Death

PhilosophersToday my haiku is from November 2nd of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Philosophers, Scientists, and Other Ponderers, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Death”

death is not failure
death is not the enemy
death is not your fault

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Honoring My Dead

Back CameraAlex Terrgi here. We had a party in our new house last weekend. My human has strange ideas about parties. This one was about celebrating dead people. And even dead dogs. I thought parties were supposed to be fun. How is that a fun thing?

The humans brought pictures of people (and dogs, like I said) and put them on a table and then they told stories about them, and some of them cried while they were talking. I kinda wanted to cry too, when my human talked about my now-gone sister, Goody Beagle. (She was one of the dog picture on the table.)

But I’m not made for crying, I’m made for laughing. The only thing good about the party was that one of the partygoers brought her new puppy along. The puppy doesn’t know all the human rules yet, so she pooped in the corner and peed on the kitchen floor and then she chewed on someone’s purse. I mean, I almost died laughing.

If I had, they could put a picture of me on the table next year.