Haiku Friday: Fog

haiku pic 2Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of Fog:

a foggy morning

silvery curtains soft fall

trees turn into ghosts

It’s Haiku Friday again.  For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose.  I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog.  Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those).  That’s it.

Tip: One More Good Book

9780985415105-JacketGray_novacek.inddBorder Crossings: Coming of Age in the Czech Resistance

by Charles Novacek

Author Charles Novacek finished writing this memoir of his exciting life shortly before he died, and his widow Sandra Novacek made sure it got published. I didn’t work on the book in any capacity, except to read Sandra’s Preface and tell her I thought it was good. So is the whole book.

Border Crossings tells the story of Charles Novacek’s youth – as a young child he was a member of the Czech Resistance fighting against the Nazis, and as a teen and young man he fought against the Communist takeover of Czechoslovakia and was imprisoned for it. His is a story of triumph, dedication, and love of country, and how heroes come in all ages.

I love stories about how “big history” (that stuff in the newspapers and history books) intersects with individual lives, and the effects of each upon the other. Stories exploring our pasts prove that individual actions had consequences, sometimes far-reaching ones; and the corollary to this means that our actions today likewise have consequences. What we do, say, think, and feel is important – to history, to the present, and to the future. Maybe if we really knew this, as a species we might make better decisions. Border Crossings is available on Amazon.com.

Compost: Identity

universeWhen I was writing a synopsis of my new book Grandma’s Masks (title still up in the air, see my earlier post). I wrote that the book was at its heart about identity – how we know who we are through the stories we tell and the masks we wear. Suddenly I realized that all my books share that theme. My first book, Eating Mythos Soup, is about a shape-shifter/angel/guide who listens to people’s stories in order to show them who they are at their core. My book Making History is about showing people how to use the events and trends of “big history” in connection with their own stories – in order to show themselves who they have been in the past and can be in the future. My short-story collections Childish Discoveries, Adult Distractions, and Creature Discomforts are about the common disguises we all use to shield who we are from our own eyes. Even my book Dog Park Diary, about my dog’s visits to the dog park, is about Goody Beagle announcing who she is and what is important to her.

Maybe all writing is about searching for our identity, and trying to come to grips with its slippery nature. Who are you? Are you the stories you tell, the stories you believe, or the masks you wear? Who are we as a species? Or even who are we in the context of this vast Universe – are we, as individuals or as a group, just one of the zillions of specks of energy in an endless, always-moving, conglomeration of sparks, with no patterns and no rules? Perhaps it is only our stories that give us the answer to who we are, even as the stories themselves morph and mutate depending on who is telling and who is listening.

Haiku Friday: Stories

zen gardenHere’s my haiku for today, on the topic of Stories:

what your stories mean

depends on who is telling

and who listening

It’s Haiku Friday again.  For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose.  I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog.  Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those).  That’s it.

Tip: And Yet Another Good Book

wise_irish_womenWise Irish Women: A Journey of Love, Loyalty, and Friendship to Inspire the Irish Spirit
by Patricia Connorton Kagerer and Laura Prendergast Gordon

I love books that share inspiring stories of real people, so I had a lot of fun editing this book for Tricia Kagerer and Laura Gordon. This book has 35 of these real people, all women with a connection to Ireland. It’s full of Irish charm, Irish luck, Irish perseverance, Irish faith, Irish love of the land, and much more. If you have any Irish ancestors, as many Americans do, you will resonate with this book. Even if you have no Irish ancestors, it will inspire you to look at your own heritage to discover its special gifts. You can purchase this book on Amazon.com

Ghostwriting for a Dog: Leftovers

leftoversAlex Terrgi here. I don’t like milkbones. I know dogs are supposed to like milkbones, but I don’t. Who makes up these rules about what dogs are supposed to like and not like? My sister Goody Beagle liked milkbones, but that proves nothing, because Goody was a beagle, and beagles like anything that could be called food. The only thing Goody didn’t like was olives, and I don’t blame her. I don’t like them either.

Back to milkbones. It’s actually not just milkbones I don’t like; I don’t like any kind of dry biscuit things. They taste like wood. I don’t like wood either. I like juicy and meaty treats, and sometimes I like jerky treats even though they’re dry, if they have enough chicken flavor to them. But those dry things that my human says are “bacon flavor” – what a crock! They’re wood, I tell you. And I don’t like them. (Just thought I’d say it again in case you weren’t listening the first time.)

The best kind of treats are what my human calls “leftovers.” That’s what is left on her plate or in the cooking pan after she is done eating. All dogs like leftovers. In fact eating leftovers is how we became dogs instead of wolves.

If some human wanted to make a lot of money on dog treats, they would skip dry biscuits and jerky and go right to marketing leftovers. Why hasn’t anyone done this yet?

Haiku Friday: Clouds

haiku pic 1Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of Clouds:

wild winds from the sea

herding the clouds before them

it’s raining sideways

It’s Haiku Friday again.  For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose.  I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog.  Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those).  That’s it.

Tip: Another Good Book

Teaching Algebra to Chickens coverTeaching Algebra to Chickens

by Don Peckham

We editors and ghosts get to meet such interesting people. I loved working on this book with author Don Peckham, who often made me laugh, and whose questions made me think. His book asks those big questions that we all ask, and although he admits that the answers are unknowable, that does not stop him from asking them – or poking fun at both the questions and the answers. Here are just a few of them: If there is a God and this ultimate being made everything, then who made him? Why is there war? What is death? Does the universe go on forever? What is forever, anyway? And many more. The bottom line: this book is fun to read. You can purchase it on Amazon.com

Haiku Friday: Questions

haiku pic 2Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of Questions:

what’s the French for “zip”?

does “caw” mean “get out” in Crow?

random wonderings

It’s Haiku Friday again.  For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose.  I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog.  Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those).  That’s it.

Tip: Good Books

If you are a businessperson, there are a plethora of books out there that give good advice on how to start a business, run a business, get clients for your business, handle your employees, and more. So just in case you need a few more, here are 4 business-related books that I believe are excellent. I know they are excellent because I was privileged to work with these authors as their editor or writing coach. I guess you could say I’m not totally objective, but I get no royalties or affiliate payments – I simply recommend them because I do know a good book when I read one.

Berried in Chocolate book coverBuried in Chocolate

by Shari Fitzpatrick

From the founder of The Berry Factory comes this down-to-earth, heartfelt business success story, designed to appeal to the ever-growing number of people who are drawn to home-based entrepreneurship and who are searching for successful role models. Shari is a unique character (and fun to work with) but her lessons on how to start and run a successful business apply to everyone. Also who doesn’t like to read about chocolate? You can purchase this book on Amazon.com.

 

IntentionalNetworkercover-199x300The Intentional Networker

by Patti DeNucci

If you are one of those introverts (like me) who just wants to “sell your stuff” without having to get out and network, you’ll love this book. Patti DeNucci shows you how to have fun networking with the people who can help you be successful – without changing who you are. Patti shows you that selling yourself means being true to yourself, your purpose, and your mission in life. Full of humor and true adventures in entrepreneurship, this book teaches you about business and yourself at the same time. You can purchase this book on Amazon.com.

 

Ungame cover(2)The Un-Game: Four-Play to Business as Unusual

by Ingrid Martine

“The Un-Game” is both a fictional story about a newbie manager trying to learn his craft, and a blueprint for a new kind of 21st century business leader. It teaches how to play the game because the game is worth playing – and is in fact, not a game, but life. You can purchase this book on Amazon.com.

 

Six Figures book coverSix Figures: Mixing Friendship & Business … Like a Good Martini

by Gina McAndrew, Lee Knapp, Barbara Parsons, Susan Cullen, Nicolle Carfagnini, and Lauri Mitchell

Six Figures is full of fun and laughter, tears and hard-won wisdom from six professional women who support each other in business and in friendship – regardless of their vast differences in background, age, abilities, and philosophy. They call themselves the “Bad Girls” and when you read this book you might think about forming a Bad Girls group of your own. This book is available on Amazon.