Haiku Friday: Soup

Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of Soup:

Make a winter soup
potato thick, onion sweet
drool it from your smile

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

Technorati Tags: Haiku writing syllable soup winter thick sweet potato onion smile Kim Pearson

Storytelling Fun Round Robin

Once a month I invite you to play a game called Round Robin Storytelling on this blog. In case you missed it, here’s how this works: I start a story by giving you a couple of paragraphs, then stop at a critical juncture. If you want to play, go ahead and pick up the story and write (in the comments) what happens next – just a paragraph or two, no more. Then stop. Then either I or another reader of this blog will add their piece of the story, and stop. Then another person, or I, will continue. Hopefully. If no one comments, then I guess I’ll have to finish the story myself.

Now, this story is actually one already written all the way through, but that doesn’t mean this story must be this way. Other ways are possible, maybe even desirable. Want to play? Here is the beginning of a story called “Wolf Sees the Light”.

Long ago, or maybe only yesterday, on a cloudy cool night, Wolf pads along the banks of a river. Trees along the bank are shrouded in mist, but Wolf sees a light shining between the trunks, beckoning him onward. Gliding through the river is Wolf’s friend the Beaver, her eyes glinting and her tail flat on the water. She too is traveling toward the light.

The full moon comes from behind the clouds. Wolf and Beaver see a bridge across the river. Beaver climbs out of the water and joins Wolf on the path, where flowers suddenly spring up and begin to blink open and shut. There are thousands of them, turquoise, purple, orange. Wolf and Beaver walk down the path to the bridge. The light is shining on someone asleep under the bridge.


Now what happens? Who’s sleeping under the bridge? I hope to find out . . .

Technorati Tags: storytelling round robin Kim Pearson StoryKim fun blog paragraph

Goody Beagle says: Attention Junkies

Dogs are the worst attention-junkies there are. Anyone who lives with a dog knows this. If you don’t pay attention to your dog, you probably have holes in your underwear and a fat dog who gets into the garbage no matter how difficult you try to make it. You probably have deep holes under your fence and a $3000 vet bill for surgery to remove the whole basketball he ate.

Paying attention means more than saying “good dog” at intervals. It means more than plunking down a bowl of kibble once a day, or patting your dog on the head when you come home. Paying attention means doing things that are important to your dog. Like going on a walk, making sure you pause for the excellent smells along the way. Or throwing a ball or a Frisbee, even when they don’t bring it back, or playing tug for more than thirty seconds. Not just a pat on the head, but maybe a whole body massage that makes your dog wiggle with joy.

And most of all, paying attention means just hanging out with your dog, being together, doing whatever you are doing, especially if you love doing it.

Your reward in all this? Your dog will pay attention to you.

Technorati Tags: Goody Beagle Kim Pearson StoryKim attention junkies dogs reward

Haiku Friday: Grandma

Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of Grandma:

From Grandma’s wrinkles
slow soft ripples spread outward,
spirals gathering

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

Technorati Tags: Haiku writing syllable Grandma wrinkles ripples spiral Kim Pearson

Writing Tips for Ghostwriters: Interviewing Again

To be a good ghostwriter it’s not enough that you be a good writer. You also have to know how to get those ideas and stories out of your clients’ heads and into your fingers. One of the resources in my “Living as a Ghost” program (http://kimpearson.me/learntoghost.html), which helps writers learn the skill of ghostwriting, is my article titled “12 Essential Interviewing Tips.” Here are 2 more of those tips, in brief:

  • Respect your client’s wishes. You don’t live their life. If she says this passage will hurt her sister’s feelings, no matter how integral, juicy, beautifully written you feel this passage is, take it out. She’s not your sister.
  • Be interested, truly interested, in this complex human being who has trusted you to tell their story or present their ideas. You must want to know their passions, motivations, fears, stumbling blocks, faults and virtues, priorities, and joys. You must really, really, want to know.


Technorati Tags: writing tips Kim Pearson StoryKim ghostwriter Living as a Ghost interview interviewing respect interest interested

Compost: Winter Solstice

December 21st is the Winter Solstice, the shortest day and the longest night of the year.

Although there is more winter to come, the Light is on its way back.

There are many customs and festivals associated with this time of year. Here are two of my favorites: Gather a group of people in a room, close the door and turn off all lights. Send the youngest person into another room. (If the youngest person is a child, send a supervisor with them.) While in the dark, think about the blessings of the past year, and what you would like the Light to bring you. Meanwhile, the youngest person will light a candle or candles and when the time is right, open the door and bring the Light into the room again. This sounds simple, but it can be powerful and dramatic. Sing “light” or “sunshine” songs as the new Light is carried into the room. Some of our favorites are: You Are My Sunshine, This Little Light of Mine, and Let It Be.

Have a Yule fire. Tie a ribbon around a piece of wood, and place it on the fire. Aromatic wood is even more special. When the fire dies down, rake out one small bit of charred wood. Letit cool completely (this may take days) and save it for next year’s Yule celebration. Next year place this tiny bit of charred wood into the Yule fire, as a symbol of continuation. In this way the same Yule fire may keep alight for years on end.

Technorati Tags: compost writing Kim Pearson StoryKim winter winter solstice day night custom festivals yule

Haiku Friday: Light

Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of Light:

you would never know
blinded by a cloak of dark
the Light is coming

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

Technorati Tags: Haiku writing syllable Light blinded cloak dark Kim Pearson

Compost: A Distracting e-book

Check out another short story collection available as an e-book – Adult Distractions. (http://tinyurl.com/2a3lotx) Look below the surface distractions of everyday life in these 8 short stories, and explore the truths that lie beneath, sometimes far into the past. A dead carpenter haunts his bed, a fireman’s legacy turns to ashes, and a photographer’s favorite subject becomes his cage. These stories and others might make you twitch with recognition of your own forgotten history.

Here’s the first few paragraphs of one of the stories, “Gabriel’s Bed.” If you want to read the whole story, you have to get the collection. http://tinyurl.com/2a3lotx

It was a fine spring morning, and one of Eva McMillan’s good days. The sunlight streamed through the window and over the bed, dust motes dancing in the cool sweet air. The birds peeped in the trees outside, and Eva remembered who she was.

Eva relished her reprieves from confusion. She sat up in bed and bounced like a child. The mattress felt different than she remembered. It was firm and springy, and the familiar lumps and hollows seemed to be gone. Perhaps Margaret had bought a new mattress. Eva had a vague memory of her threatening to do so.

She lifted a corner of the sheet and peered at the mattress beneath. It had pink roses on a pale blue background. It must be a new one. She was almost sure the old one had yellow stripes. “How like Margaret,” thought Eva.

Her lips curled at the thought of her daughter-in-law. Margaret was always trying to sabotage the Bed. As if a new mattress would make a difference. The power was in the Bed itself. The frame and the bedstead were over three hundred years old. Only Margaret, with her equal measures of stupidity and spite, would think a Sears mattress could overcome three hundred years of tradition.

Eva reached up and smoothed her hand lovingly over one of the old oak knobs on the headboard. It felt warm and satiny, almost soft. “But it’s hard, she chuckled to herself. “Oh yes, very hard.”


Technorati Tags:compost writing Kim Pearson StoryKim ebook distractions distracting adult short story collection everyday life read

Goody Beagle says: My Job

I like to play as much as the next dog, but the best play is where I get to practice my Beagle skills, like smelling and tracking and howling. That’s my real work in the world. My ancestors were rabbit hunters when rabbits were an important part of humans’ food supply. Just because you humans don’t eat as many rabbits as you used to doesn’t mean that I should be out of a job. Now beagles work as explosive and bomb sniffers, and drug detectives, and even as medical researchers. Our noses are so keen they can detect sickness way before any of your human machines do. So if you want a Beagle to have fun, let us smell and track things. We’ll be happier, and so will you.

But not all dogs are beagles, unfortunately. Take my BFF Alex MadMutt, who lives with my human’s father, who we call The Grandpa. Alex is part Terrier (the other parts of him are unknown, but let’s talk about the terrier part.) What makes a terrier happy? A chance to dig, and dig, and then dig some more – especially if there is something in the hole that they can grab hold of and kill – or at least shake around. Terriers’ ancestors were mighty hunters, bred to find any kind of small game or pest that hid in holes. And once they found it, they grabbed it and shook it hard enough to break its neck. This may sound brutal to you, but terriers are proud of their skill, and they should be. Think how many more humans would have died of plague if it hadn’t been for terriers hunting and killing rats! So if you live with a terrier, give them something to chase into a hole. Or play their favorite game with them – tug. This gives them a chance to grab on, shake, and never let go until the other player gives up. If you don’t do this, you might find that your terrier has declared war on pillows. (The Grandpa learned this the hard way. He now lives in a pillow-less home.)

Remember: to a dog, play is not as much fun as work. Here’s your job as a dog “owner.” (You don’t really own us, you know.) Find out what your dog’s work is, and then let them do it.

Technorati Tags: Goody Beagle Kim Pearson StoryKim job play practice dog Beagle howl

Haiku Friday: Socks

Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of Socks:

eddies of iced air
whisper along your bare legs
time to wear your socks

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

Technorati Tags: Haiku writing syllable socks eddies air whisper legs time Kim Pearson