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Pokemon Go Home

27541305793_f19c00519a_zThe other day I went to my writers’ group meeting, as I do almost every week. Lots of good writers there, with good ideas, encouragement, and support for each other. Also laughter about the absurdities of our profession. I’m a big fan of writers’ groups, because as we all know, writing can be lonely at times. Isolating even. It’s good to be with people of like mind and similar issues.

On this particular day I came a little early and there were only four other members of the group sitting around the table. They were deep in discussion when I arrived. Serious involved expressions on their faces, interspersed with loud barks of laughter and snorts. Even some hand waving. I tried to catch a clue as to what they were so animated about, but for at least ten minutes I was totally at a loss.

“I’m tired of catching rabbits, I should trade.”
“Are you saving your evolving?”
“You should always wait for your eggs to hatch, you’ll get double.”
“OMG there’s a wheedle!”
“Wheedles suck!”
“Rat attacks …”

The light suddenly went on when one of them said, “Pokemon Go is the best exercise ever. I figure in a year’s time the world will be filled with thin geeks with muscular bodies.”

My writers’ group has been hijacked by Pokemon Go! Sigh. Perhaps this is an escape from today’s political trauma drama. I hope both go away soon. I need to get back to the real world inside my head.

Pirates

DisorganizedToday my haiku is from August 19th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for the Happily Disorganized and Others of Jumbled Mind, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Pirates”:

blinded by profits
stupidity plus greed kills
pirates are not cool

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.    

Hot Dogs

disneyland-1180954_1280Alex Terrgi here. According to my human, I was born in a place called Los Angeles. Now I live in a place close to Seattle. So when it was really really hot the other day my human told me that where we live is much cooler than where I was born, so I should be glad I’m lucky to live here and not complain by rolling my eyes and panting. She says watching me makes her feel even hotter.

I think she’s full of hot air, if you want to know the truth. (That’s a word joke.) I don’t believe Los Angeles is hotter than here, because if it was all the dogs would be dead. And if all the dogs in Los Angeles were dead, then Los Angeles itself would shrivel up and die too, And just a few days ago my human told me her granddaughter was in Disneyland on a vacation, and then she said Disneyland is close to Los Angeles. So it can’t be hotter than here because no place can survive without dogs. Get my reasoning? I’m a pretty smart dog, you know.

Also a very hot one.

Money

DisorganizedToday my haiku is from August 12th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for the Happily Disorganized and Others of Jumbled Mind, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Money”:

money is not real
it was thought up long ago
and became a god

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.   

 

New Words

bully sticksLast Monday I ghostblogged for my dog Alex so he could complain about a treat he did not appreciate, called a “bully stick.” He thought it meant I was trying to make him eat something nasty. (Turns out this might be true, but it certainly wasn’t deliberate.)

I had a different take on the meaning of Bully Stick. After Alex refused to eat it, I wondered why. It looked like leather, so I thought it was some kind of rawhide. That night, when my daughter and son-in-law came to dinner, I told them about Alex hiding the bully stick and asked if they knew what bully sticks were made of.

My daughter just shrugged, but my son-in-law spoke up. “Bull pizzle,” he said.

“Huh?” I had never heard the word pizzle before, and since I am a highly-educated word-person, this kinda bothered me. But my son-in-law is a knowledgeable guy not given to silly jokes, so I believed him and asked him what it meant. “It means penis,” he said.

“Oh come on,” I said. So I got the package of bully sticks out of the cupboard and read the ingredients. Sure enough, it said: “Ingredients: Bull pizzle.” Nothing else, just that.

My daughter spoke up then. “But it’s over a foot long!” she said. She and I looked at each other.

“OMG the poor cows,” I said.

Later I googled the word “pizzle” and sure enough it’s an old English/Germanic word and really does mean the penis of an animal. I guess you’re never too old or too educated to learn new words.

Games

DisorganizedToday my haiku is from August 5th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for the Happily Disorganized and Others of Jumbled Mind,, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Games”:

playing at bizness
a game all about money
for the ruling class

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

B.S.

bully sticksAlex Terrgi here. Sometimes my human gives me treats. Sometimes the treats taste good so I eat them up pretty fast. Other times the treats taste nasty so I hide them instead. Such was the case for something she called a “bully stick.” This is a long skinny piece of hard-as-rock stuff made out of what looks like skin and smells like old poop. (Unlike new poop, which has a glorious smell.)

So she gave me this bully stick thing the other day, just as she was going out the door and not taking me with her. This was a weak attempt to make me feel better about being left behind. It did not work.

I took one lick of the bully stick because I am a fair-minded dog – perhaps the bully stick tasted okay despite its smell. But no such luck. So I gingerly picked up the b.s. and took it into my human’s bedroom. I jumped up on the bed, taking the b.s. with me. I pawed at the pillow and buried the BS underneath it. Then I pawed the pillow back so the BS was hidden.

Then I laughed my ass off when she came home and found it. I bet she didn’t like the smell either.

P.S. Bully sticks are not made out of poop. It’s even worse than that. Google “bully stick” if you don’t believe me.

Lazy

HistoriansToday my haiku is from July 29th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Historians, Storytellers, and Other Guardians of Truth, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Lazy”:

you’re vulnerable
when you’re too lazy to think
let the lies begin

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.  

Ancestory

AuntJuliaHere’s another story from the family history I’m currently writing. When I began researching, I hoped to find some well-known personages in our ancestry, preferably known for good and not bad behavior. However, I discovered we do not count Abraham Lincoln or Thomas Jefferson among our ancestors. Nor can we lay claim to Chief Sealth or Robert E. Lee, Isaac Newton, Paul Revere, or Queen Victoria.

 

But I did find one notable person who personally knew some famous people. Her name was Julia Johnson. She was born in 1873, the sister of Charlotte Johnson, who was my mother’s maternal grandmother. Therefore Julia was my Mom’s great-aunt, and she was a well-known person among the rich and titled Londoners of the early twentieth century.

 

Julia was born and raised in Spalding, in Lincolnshire England. In 1896 she left Spalding and headed to London to train as a nurse (one of the few professions open to women) at St. Saviour’s Infirmary. She qualified in 1899 and then worked at Brook Fever Hospital, and in 1902 she joined the London Association of Nurses as an agency nurse, hired by private patients who needed in-home nursing. It was this career that brought her into contact with many famous and titled people. She nursed Lord Landsdowne, who was England’s secretary of state for foreign affairs, a wealthy and titled man. She also nursed Charles Darwin’s sister, accompanying her to Switzerland as she recuperated from an illness – maybe tuberculosis. At the time, people often went to the Alps to recuperate, as mountain air was supposed to be healthier.

 

Julia also nursed Lady Randolph Churchill, the mother of Winston Churchill, and became very familiar with the Churchill family. According to a letter Julia wrote to her sister Charlotte (which has since been lost, just referred to in another letter), Julia also nursed Winston Churchill himself when he had pneumonia. If this family legend is true, my great-great aunt Julia could be said to be one of the saviors of the modern world, for if Winston Churchill had poor nursing he might have died – medicine in the early 1900s was primitive by today’s standards, and good nursing often was the difference between life and death. And if Churchill had died as a young man, then “blood, sweat, and tears” might never have been said, and the Nazis might have overrun England!

 

Yay for Auntie Julia! What’s in your family tree?

Bananas

HistoriansToday my haiku is from July 22nd of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Historians, Storytellers, and Other Guardians of Truth, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Bananas”:

ancestor wisdom:
live where the bananas grow
remember to share

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here