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Lazy

HistoriansToday my haiku is from July 29th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Historians, Storytellers, and Other Guardians of Truth, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Lazy”:

you’re vulnerable
when you’re too lazy to think
let the lies begin

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.  

Ancestory

AuntJuliaHere’s another story from the family history I’m currently writing. When I began researching, I hoped to find some well-known personages in our ancestry, preferably known for good and not bad behavior. However, I discovered we do not count Abraham Lincoln or Thomas Jefferson among our ancestors. Nor can we lay claim to Chief Sealth or Robert E. Lee, Isaac Newton, Paul Revere, or Queen Victoria.

 

But I did find one notable person who personally knew some famous people. Her name was Julia Johnson. She was born in 1873, the sister of Charlotte Johnson, who was my mother’s maternal grandmother. Therefore Julia was my Mom’s great-aunt, and she was a well-known person among the rich and titled Londoners of the early twentieth century.

 

Julia was born and raised in Spalding, in Lincolnshire England. In 1896 she left Spalding and headed to London to train as a nurse (one of the few professions open to women) at St. Saviour’s Infirmary. She qualified in 1899 and then worked at Brook Fever Hospital, and in 1902 she joined the London Association of Nurses as an agency nurse, hired by private patients who needed in-home nursing. It was this career that brought her into contact with many famous and titled people. She nursed Lord Landsdowne, who was England’s secretary of state for foreign affairs, a wealthy and titled man. She also nursed Charles Darwin’s sister, accompanying her to Switzerland as she recuperated from an illness – maybe tuberculosis. At the time, people often went to the Alps to recuperate, as mountain air was supposed to be healthier.

 

Julia also nursed Lady Randolph Churchill, the mother of Winston Churchill, and became very familiar with the Churchill family. According to a letter Julia wrote to her sister Charlotte (which has since been lost, just referred to in another letter), Julia also nursed Winston Churchill himself when he had pneumonia. If this family legend is true, my great-great aunt Julia could be said to be one of the saviors of the modern world, for if Winston Churchill had poor nursing he might have died – medicine in the early 1900s was primitive by today’s standards, and good nursing often was the difference between life and death. And if Churchill had died as a young man, then “blood, sweat, and tears” might never have been said, and the Nazis might have overrun England!

 

Yay for Auntie Julia! What’s in your family tree?

Bananas

HistoriansToday my haiku is from July 22nd of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Historians, Storytellers, and Other Guardians of Truth, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Bananas”:

ancestor wisdom:
live where the bananas grow
remember to share

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here

 

Handsome Is a Signature Look

Mohawk AlexAlex Terrgi here. My human took me to the groomer the other day. The groomer human cut off all my scruffiness, even the scruff on my tail. She kept my Mohawk, though, because my human told her it was my “Signature Look”, whatever that is. The grooming was kind of fun – lots of petting and being told what a good dog I am. Who doesn’t like being told they’re good?

And when the groomer was done, my human told me I was handsome. I like being called handsome, of course, but actually I think I was always handsome. But I’m glad she’s happy.

Grownup

HistoriansToday my haiku is from July 15th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Historians, Storytellers, and Other Guardians of Truth, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Grownup”:

never believe this:
all lessons learned, all fun past
means you’re all grown up

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.  

Grandparenting

Corey ADP dinner 990001 (2)I’m working on a series of books covering my family’s history over generations. I’m lucky to have ancestors who did and said interesting things, some of which (not all) I think they’d like passed down through the generations. My father certainly did. Here is an excerpt of a letter he wrote about twenty years ago to one of his grandchildren, who was around three (!) at the time.

Dear Grandchild:

To a grandfather who cares, the most important things in life are his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren yet to be born. It is not enough to just live a life and not try to help prepare the world for a new generation, or the new generation for the world. Most parents do invest a lot of time, money, and emotional energy in providing good health care and solid education for their offspring before turning them loose on their own. However, the success of a person’s life, to a great deal, is judged by the success of the following generation.

Each grandfather must face death. Life has meaning only if we realize it will end. As we review our life, not only do we evaluate the stature or our descendants, but we must honestly review our own lives as a whole, and see what was accomplished, what was done well, whether some dreams were fulfilled, whether life was enjoyed, if friends were made, if love was found, or if he worked for a positive cause.

The letter goes on for another three pages. I doubt whether the three-year old understood any of it at the time, but today this letter will be shared with even younger generations, and maybe someday with those not even born yet.

Names

HistoriansToday my haiku is from July 8th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Historians, Storytellers, and Other Guardians of Truth, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Names”:

look for the stories
behind the names we’ve assigned
maybe you’ll find Truth

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Lies

HistoriansToday my haiku is from July 1st of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Historians, Storytellers, and Other Guardians of Truth, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Lies ”:

if you have blind friends
choosing to believe big lies
let them learn. love them

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here

Mountains

Mountain dog parkAlex Terrgi here. When me and my fur-buddy Jackie go to the dog park, we play in the shadow of a big mountain. My human seems to think this is a big deal. She says things like “so beautiful!” But I don’t really care about the mountain. It’s too far away. And way way too big. And especially the mountain has no smell. Maybe if I could climb the mountain I would like its smells, but like I said before it’s too far away and too big. As for beautiful, well . . . I’d rather look at bear poop. (And smell it too.)

But I do like the dog park, so I keep my opinions to myself about the stupid mountain. I don’t want her to stop bringing me here.

Prizes

PhilosophersToday my haiku is from June 24th of my book A Haiku Book of Days for Philosophers, Scientists, and Other Ponderers, one of a 7-book series. The haiku topic for today is “Prizes”:

you are a show-off
because you are a human
hoping for prizes

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

If you’re interested in the story of how The Haiku Book of Days series came to be, check out my previous blog post here. You can purchase this book on Amazon here.