from-the-compost-header

The Synopsis Dread

Writer's BlockI finished my new novel, The Masks on Grandmother’s Wall, months ago. I had it edited. The editor suggested I expand some parts. So I did. The novel is now complete, and I am very happy with it. But now comes the icky part.

I have to write a synopsis for the book proposal. I’m okay with writing the promotion plans, my bio, competitive analysis, all that stuff. But for some reason I just detest writing synopses, at least of my own work. So for nearly six months I have been putting this chore off. And The Masks on Grandmother’s Wall is still patiently waiting …

So finally I made myself write a synopsis. But because of my issues around writing synopses, I don’t know whether it’s a good synopsis, or a bad one, or just mediocre. Therefore I am sharing it on this blog, to see if someone will give me their opinion.

So here it is, the synopsis of The Masks on Grandmother’s Wall. What do you think? Would you want to read this book? Please comment. (But be gentle.)

The Masks on Grandmother’s Wall is a short novel of 29,000 words, including fifteen original animal folktales. It is about the power of storytelling and how it connects, inspires, teaches, and heals us. It is about the elusive nature of truth and the illusion of safety. Finally, it is about the search for identity, and finding a place where you belong.

Long ago, or maybe only yesterday, cousins Emma and Lucy arrive at their grandmother’s empty house. They have come to pack up Grandma’s studio after her death. Grandma was a storyteller and mask artist, and memories of her stories and masks come flooding back during the afternoon Emma and Lucy spend at her seemingly now-empty house.

While they take the masks off the wall of the studio and wrap them up, Emma and Lucy tell each other some of the stories that go with the masks. The fifteen stories they choose are told in the classic folk-tale style, companions to animal masks, such as the Beaver who tells “How to Lighten Up,” the Flea who tells “How to Stop an Itch,” the Frog who tells “How to Take a Leap of Faith,” and so on, until they come to the final story, the Spider, who tells “How to Find Your Way Home.”

Emma and Lucy are young women in their twenties, closer than most cousins and also close to their grandmother, to whom they often told their problems and griefs. These problems are still operating in their lives, but Grandma is no longer there to help them. Emma is a self-described “waffler” who cannot decide on a profession or a man, and dismisses her inborn talents that are obvious to others but not to her. Lucy is a budding archaeologist in love with scientific facts and fearful of anything that could be described as “deep.”

As they tell the stories and wear the masks, the narrative shifts between Emma and Lucy. Until the last story when Grandma herself, through the mask of Spider, again helps Emma and Lucy discover truths about themselves.

And so it ends, or maybe it is just beginning.”

Haiku Friday: Home

WritersToday my haiku is from July 31st of my new book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians, and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Home”

words pop out your mouth
once you birth them, they leave home
gone to see the world

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Haiku Friday: Sounds

WritersToday my haiku is from July 24th of my new book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians, and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Sounds”

from those simple things
cluttering your daily life
seventeen short sounds

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Haiku Friday: Paradox

WritersToday my haiku is from July 17th of my new book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians, and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Paradox”

despite all its rules
haiku is so flexible
long live paradox

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Haiku Friday: Noodle

WritersToday my haiku is from July 10th of my new book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians, and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Noodle”

noodle with your words
shape in tubes, strands, or pouches
boil in brain water

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

Haiku Friday: Trust

TWritersoday my haiku is from July 3rd of my new book A Haiku Book of Days for Writers, Painters, Musicians, and Other Artists, one of a 7-book series. The topic for today is: “Trust”

computers go down
and carvers writing on stones
didn’t trust paper

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.

The Holy Trinity of Dogs

Zipper 590001Alex Terrgi here. My human is fond of telling me that I am the best dog in the world – but then she always adds “who is alive today.” And then she mentions my sister Goody Beagle, who I agree was a fantastic dog, and another dog I never met, Zipper. Both Goody and Zipper are dead, at least their bodies are. But they still seem to be alive in my human’s memory.

Zipper was my human’s dog when she was a little girl, and he must have been some dog because she still remembers a lot about him and it was a LONG time since she was a little girl. I’ve seen pictures of Zipper. His last name was Dachshund, which means he had a looong body and short – very short – legs. Kinda funny looking dog, if you ask me.

But hey, looks aren’t everything. If even half the stories my human tells about Zipper’s courage and love are true, he probably was as good as Goody and me. I am glad to be part of my human’s Holy Trinity of Dogs: Saint Zipper, Saint Goody, and Saint Alex.

Haiku Friday: Party

DisorganizedToday my haiku is from June 26th of my new book A Haiku Book of Days for the Happily Disorganized and Others of Jumbled Mind, one of a 7-book series. As you can tell from the title, these haiku are all over the place. The topic for today is “Headlights”:

rainy morning streets
headlights mirror busy lives
blindly off to work

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

You can purchase this book on Amazon here.