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Haiku Friday: Giving

haiku pic 2Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of “Giving”:

do not count the cost

go ahead and pay the price

give until you die

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

Serial: Reasons to Be a Ghostwriter: Reason #5

ghostHere’s another excerpt from my ebook “Ten Good Reasons to be a Ghost”:

Reason #5: You can give a written voice to those who can’t write, or who think they can’t. It’s true that in our literate American culture, just about everyone can write. Even a first-grader can write a simple story. But not everyone can write well. In fact, most people can’t write well. Writing well takes talent, art, skill, and most importantly time and practice. Not everyone has these attributes or time. But just because they can’t write well doesn’t mean they don’t have good stories (see Reason #4). Non-writers’ stories, ideas, tips and tricks deserve to be told just as much as anyone else’s. You can make that happen.

Shameless Promotion: If you’re interested in becoming a ghost, check out my online course Learn to Ghost (LINK – www.LearnToGhost.com).

Ghostwriting for a Dog: The Flea

big fleaAlex Terrgi here. One of the chapters in my human’s new book The Masks on Grandmother’s Wall (soon to be published, she says) is called “The Flea.” It’s about a flea who talks, in human words, to a human who is so dumb she talks back to the flea.

I don’t know where my human gets her facts, but I need to break it to her that fleas do not talk to humans. They don’t talk to dogs either. They have better uses for their mouths: they bite. And they suck down blood. And they spit their nasty itching juice into your skin. Then they bite and suck and spit some more. That’s about it.

Not only does my human’s Flea talk, it makes jokes. Not funny jokes, sarcastic jokes. Again, this is not true to life—I know some fleas personally, and they don’t make jokes, sarcastic or otherwise. Maybe they are laughing on the inside, but in my opinion fleas do not have a sense of humor.

I repeat: fleas bite and suck and spit. That’s all they do. This is why humans should not make them famous by writing books about them. They don’t deserve fame.

Haiku Friday: Old Songs

haiku pic 3Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of “Old Songs”:

singing the old songs

Patsy Cline and Doris Day

in your mother’s voice

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

 

Serial: Reasons to be a Ghostwriter: Reason #4

ghostHere’s another excerpt from my ebook “Ten Good Reasons to be a Ghost”:

Reason #4: You will hear and tell great stories. Writers are storytellers. They also make great story listeners. It’s a cliché that everyone has a story, but it’s true. Everyone’s life matters. Everyone knows some interesting things. As a ghostwriter, you can even help people find the stories they didn’t know they had. Stories are important. They connect us, teach us, inspire us, and heal us. Great stories live forever.

Shameless Promotion: If you’re interested in becoming a ghost, check out my online course Learn to Ghost (LINK – www.LearnToGhost.com).

Compost: Talking About Writing

fountain pen calligraphyThis month I’m teaching my writing class called Writing as a Spiritual Practice, which was the first writing class I ever taught, almost fifteen years ago. I loved and still love doing this class, and the participants seem to love it too.

I have noticed over time that the folks who attend Writing as a Spiritual Practice often come because of the word “spiritual” in the title. They are wonderful people. We have a great time exploring topics like “absurdity and the forbidden” and “sensory details – it’s a daffodil, not a flower.” We write our guts out. And then we play with them. (Not literally, of course.)

A few years ago I noticed that some people are put off by the word “spiritual” so didn’t come to these classes. I’ve always believed that all of us are “spiritual”—that is, we have a spirit—even when we don’t think of ourselves that way. But many people see the word “spiritual” and think someone is going to shove a religion or an occult belief down their throats. Yet these “non-spiritual” people have great stories, heart-felt ideals, and just as much poetry inside as anyone else. Also like anyone else, they often had trouble liberating those poetic voices inside them.

So I changed the title of the class to Finding Your Voice. No one seemed to be turned off by the word voice, and all sorts of people started coming to this class. They came because many of us have writing voices that are muted, stilted, confused, or strangled by expectations. Finding Your Voice and Writing as a Spiritual Practice are exactly the same—they’re about freeing those voices so that your message, whatever it is, can get out. After all, what good is your wisdom, beauty, or brilliance if you keep it locked up inside?

Nowadays I offer this class under both titles, changing the title to suit the audience. I’ve found the “spiritual” attendees are often quite noisy, happily sharing funny stories that make everyone guffaw; and the “non-spiritual” attendees often share the most ethereal poetic visions of connection and belonging.

Voice, Spirit, Whatever. It doesn’t matter what you call it. I think it’s exactly the same thing.

Haiku Friday: Drive

zen gardenHere’s my haiku for today, on the topic of “Drive”:

when it is morning

each to-do wants to be first

put your car in Drive

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.

Serial: Reasons to be a Ghostwriter: Reason #3

ghostHere’s another excerpt from my ebook “Ten Good Reasons to be a Ghost”:

Reason #3: Your mind and your heart will be stretched, and your tolerance and compassion will grow. In order to write as someone else, you must understand them on a deep level. You will learn how others think—even others radically different than you. Like actors, ghostwriters play many roles, just on the page instead of the stage. Unlike an actor, a ghostwriter is not constrained by their gender, age, race or culture. I am a middle-aged white American woman from the West Coast. But as a ghostwriter, I’ve been an African-American man from New York, a Japanese-American woman, an Iranian immigrant, a self-described redneck from Oklahoma, a Cambodian refugee, among many others. And oh yes, some middle-aged white American women. I’ve been any age from 20 to 90. I’ve been a doctor, an accountant, an entrepreneur, a cop, a scientist, a shaman, a gardener. And so on.

And guess what I discovered? We’re all human, and we have more similarities than differences. When you have participated in someone’s dream, hatred is impossible.

Shameless Promotion: If you’re interested in becoming a ghost, check out my online course Learn to Ghost (LINK – www.LearnToGhost.com).

Ghostwriting for a Dog: My Pet Girl

Alex_leaves_Alex Terrgi here. If you follow my posts on this blog, you may know that I have my own Pet Girl. She is my human’s granddaughter and she is eight years old. Eight is the perfect age for humans, you know. Although she’s going to be nine soon, and then nine will be the perfect age for humans.

My Pet Girl and I went to the dog park the other day. (We took my human grown-up with us because someone had to drive the car.) My Pet Girl threw the ball for me and ran around the edge of the park with me and called “C’mon Alex!” when I got distracted by a good smell.

Then she shooed a crabby German Shepherd away from me cuz his human told my Pet Girl that he only liked dogs as big as him and bit everyone else. And do you know what my Pet Girl said? She said, “Then why do you bring your dog here?” Good question!

My Pet Girl is smart and brave and I love her. You’d love her too if you knew her. But she can’t be your Pet Girl. She’s already taken.

Haiku Friday: Random

haiku pic 2Here’s my haiku for today, on the topic of “Random”:

marks of the writer:

random ink blobs on your shirts

keying in your sleep

It’s Haiku Friday again. For the past twenty years or so, it has been my practice to write one haiku every day. Every Friday I share a haiku here, about whatever topic I happen to choose. I invite you to write a haiku on this topic too, and share it with me and the readers of this blog. Just write it in the Comments below. The only rules are: 1) your haiku must be about the named topic; 2) you must follow the 5-7-5 syllable format; 3) no obscenities or hate (I will delete those). That’s it.